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Warbird Heritage Foundation to Restore Newly Acquired Corsair

 

Corsair
Warbird Heritage Foundation's new Corsair being disassembled before transported to Tab-Air, of East Troy, Wisconsin, where it will be restored to original its configuration.

January 17, 2013 - The Warbird Heritage Foundation, of Waukegan, Illinois, announced this week it had acquired the Goodyear FG-1D Corsair, BuNo. 92050, and plans a full airworthy restoration to original configuration.

The aircraft, N194G, which was in storage at Denver's Wings Over the Rockies Museum, was converted to an Unlimited air racer bearing the number Race 94 in the early 1970s, but it had not been flown since 1977.

Paul Wood, WHF founder, said the acquisition that closed in December 2012 capped a six-year search for "the right aircraft" to add to the WHF collection. "These planes are pretty rare and hard to find," he said. "And it's going to be a pretty lengthy installation." But when finished it will fill a void in the current collection - World War II Pacific Theater.

"Our collection currently represents the European Theater World War II, Korea, and Vietnam, but we had nothing to represent the Pacific Theater. So this is a good fit," he said.

The airplane was disassembled in Denver and transported to Tab-Air, of East Troy, Wisconsin, where it will undergo a full restoration estimated to be completed in three to five years. The plane never saw combat, but was used extensively as a Navy Reserve and Marines trainer at numerous locations in the United States before decommissioning in 1954.

Reno Air Racer Bob Mitchum had acquired the plane from another owner to convert into an Unlimited racer, with clipped wings, a higher-output Wright 2800 engine, and numerous other mods to make it lighter and faster. But it was unstable and not very competitive, and it was sold to Bob Axtell in 1977, but hasn't been flown since. The aircraft has been in storage at the Wings Over the Rockies Museum for the past 10 years.

Wood mentioned some of the many components needed for the restoration, including cowl flaps, wingtips, tail cone, wing fold mechanism, and the cockpit. He invited those interested in the restoration to follow along project progress on the WHF website and Facebook page.

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